John Franke

HOUSTON GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY

Visiting Professor of Mission and Theology

 

DPhil, University of Oxford
Doctoral Studies, Drew University
MA, Biblical Theological Seminary
BA, Nyack College

About Dr. Franke

Franke 2John R. Franke serves full-time as Theologian in Residence with Second Presbyterian Church of Indianapolis. He is also Professor of Religious Studies and Missiology for the Protestant Theological Faculty of Leuven, Belgium, and the General Coordinator for the Gospel and Our Culture Network, North America.

Prior to his current role at Second Presbyterian Church, Dr. Franke taught theology at Biblical Theological Seminary in Hatfield, PA from 1993 to 2011, including a stint as Dean of the Faculty; served for three years as Theologian in Residence at First Presbyterian Church in Allentown, PA; and helped launch the Yellowstone Theological Institute in Bozeman, Montana serving as executive director and professor of missional theology. John is married to Debra and their son JJ is a student at Messiah College.

Publications & Presentations

A prolific author, Dr. Franke as authored over 80 articles, reviews, and book chapters, as well as several books—The Character of Theology: An Introduction to its Nature, Task, and Purpose; Barth for Armchair Theologians; Manifold Witness: The Plurality of Truth; Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1-2 Samuel in the Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture. He is co-author with Stanley J. Grenz of Beyond Foundationalism: Shaping Theology in a Post-modern Context. He is currently working on an introduction to missional theology.

Contact Information

Email: jfranke@hgst.edu
  Phone: 713-942-9505


 

Membership and Offices in Learned Societies

  • American Academy of Religion
  • Society of Biblical Literature
  • American Society of Missiology
  • Karl Barth Society of North America
  • Postcolonial Theology Network
  • The Gospel and Our Culture Network

Selected Bibliography (since 1995)

Books

  • Manifold Witness: The Plurality of Truth. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2009.
  • Barth for Armchair Theologians. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2006.
  • Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1-2 Samuel in the Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture. Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 2005.
  • The Character of Theology: An Introduction to its Nature, Task, and Purpose. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2005.
  • With Stanley J. Grenz. Beyond Foundationalism: Shaping Theology in a Postmodern Context. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001.


Book chapters

  • With  Megan K. DeFranza, “Recovering the Spirit of Pentecost: Canon and Catholicity in Postcolonial Perspective,” in Evangelical Postcolonial Conversations, eds. Kay Higuera Smith, Jayachitra Lalitha, and L. Daniel Hawk (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Academic, 2014), 166-178.
  • “Good News for All People: Trinity, Plurality, and Mission,” in Revisioning, Renewing, and Rediscovering the Triune Center: Essays in Honor of Stanley J. Grenz, eds. Derek J. Tidball, Brian S. Harris, and Jason S. Sexton (Eugene, OR: Cascade Books, 2014), 59-78.
  • “Foreword” to Graham Buxton, An Uncertain Certainty: Snapshots in a Journey from “Either-Or” to “Both-And” in Christian Ministry (Eugene, OR: Cascade Books, 2014).
  • “Response to Kevin J. Vanhoozer,” in Thy Word is Truth: Five Views on Inerrancy, eds. James R. A. Merrick and Stephen M. Garrett (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2013), 253-258.
  • “Response to Michael F. Bird,” in Thy Word is Truth: Five Views on Inerrancy, eds. James R. A. Merrick and Stephen M. Garrett (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2013), 192-196.
  • “Response to Peter Enns,” in Thy Word is Truth: Five Views on Inerrancy, eds. James R. A. Merrick and Stephen M. Garrett (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2013), 137-141.
  • “Response to R. Albert Mohler Jr.,” in Thy Word is Truth: Five Views on Inerrancy, eds. James R. A. Merrick and Stephen M. Garrett (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2013), 77-81.
  • “Recasting Inerrancy: The Bible as Witness to Missional Plurality,” in Thy Word is Truth: Five Views on Inerrancy, eds. James R.A. Merrick and Stephen M. Garrett (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2013), 259-287.
  • “Theology and Postmodernity,” in The Routledge Companion to Modern Christian Thought, eds. Chad Meister and James Beilby (London: Routledge, 2013), 751-762.
  • “How Can a God of Love Order Genocide?” in The Way, ed. Mark Oestreicher (Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House, 2012), 251.
  • “Church,” in Prophetic Evangelicals: Envisioning a Just and Peaceable Kingdom, eds. Bruce Ellis Benson, Melinda Elizabeth Berry, and Peter Goodwin Heltzel (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2012), 139-149.
  • “No Comprehensive Views, No Final Conclusions: Karl Barth, Open-Ended Dogmatics, and the Emerging Church.” in Karl Barth and American Evangelicalism, eds. Bruce L. McCormack and Clifford B. Anderson. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2011, 300-322.
  • “The Future of Evangelical Theology in an Age of Empire: Postfoundational and Postcolonial,” with Mabiala Kenzo, in Evangelicals and Empire: Christian Alternatives to the Political Status Quo, eds. Bruce Ellis Benson and Peter Goodwin Heltzel. Grand Rapids: Brazos Press, 2008, 267-277.
  • “Theologies of Scripture in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries,” in Christian Theologies of Scripture: A Comparative Introduction, ed. Justin S. Holcomb. New York: New York University Press, 2006, 157-164.
  • “Christian Faith and Postmodern Theory: Theology and the Nonfoundationalist Turn,” in Christianity and the Postmodern Turn, ed. Myron B. Penner. Grand Rapids: Brazos Press, 2005, 105-121.
  • “Postmodern Evangelical Theology: A Nonfoundationalist Approach to the Christian Faith,” in Alister E. McGrath and Evangelical Theology: A Dynamic Engagement, ed. Sung Wook Chung. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2003, 280-309.
  • “Eusebius of Caesarea,” in Historians of the Christian Tradition: Their Methodology and Influence on Western Thought, eds. Michael Bauman and Martin I. Klauber. Nashville: Broadman & Holman, 1996, 59-78.

Articles in Journals

  • “The Many and the One,” Immerse: A Journal of Faith, Life and Youth Ministry 1/4 (November/December, 2010): 18-22.
  • “Making Space for the Other: A Response to Professors Baylis and Harper.” Cultural Encounters: A Journal for the Theology of Culture 6/1 (2010): 43-46.
  • “Still the Way, the Truth, and the Life.” Christianity Today 53/12 (December 2009): 27-31.
  • “Theology Reformed and Reforming: The Enduring Significance of John Calvin.” Journal of Presbyterian History 87/2 (Fall/Winter 2009): 70-73.
  • “Faith Seeking Understanding in a Postmodern Context: Stanley Grenz and Nonfoundational Theology.” Princeton Theological Review 12/1 (2006): 17-22.
  • “Postmodern Reformed Dogmatics: Reformed Theology and the Postmodern Turn.” Reformation & Revival Journal 13/1 (2004): 117-132.
  • “Postmodern and Reformed? A Response to Professors Trueman and Gaffin.” Westminster Theological Journal 65/2 (2003): 331-343.
  • “Salvation Now, Salvation Forever: Reformation Amillennialism.” Christian History 18/1 (1999): 20-22.
  • “Augustine: The Development of a Leade.,” Tabletalk 20/6 (1996): 8-10.
  • “The Search for a Gracious God,” Biblical Bulletin 86 (1995): 4-5.

Book reviews

  • “God, Plurality, and Theological Method: A Response to Kevin Vanhoozer’s Remythologizing Theology,” Southeastern Theological Review 4/1 (2013): 41-51.
  • Steven Knowles. Beyond Evangelicalism: The Theological Methodology of Stanley Grenz. Religious Studies Review 37/3 (2011): 194.
  • Mark D. Thompson, A Clear and Present Word: The Clarity of Scripture. Religious Studies Review 33/2 (2007): 126.
  • Jens Zimmermann, Recovering Theological Hermeneutics: An Incarnational-Trinitarian Theory of Interpretation. Religious Studies Review 32/1 (2006): 28.
  • Roger E. Olson, The Story of Christian Theology: Twenty Centuries of Tradition & Reform. Books & Culture, 5/6 (1999): 15-16.
  • Donald Bloesch, Theology of Word and Spirit: Authority & Method in Theology. Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 40/3 (1997): 491-3.
  • Richard Muller, The Study of Theology: From Biblical Interpretation to Contemporary Formulation. Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 38/1 (1995): 134-5.